Of Course! Game Based Staff Development

It has been sitting on my table for a few days now. In preparation for its first official outing I played (by myself sadly ) “Of Course!” the board game designed by Alex Mosley of Leicester University. The game is designed to help teams start discussing designing a new course or enhancing an existing one. Here is his reflection on building and testing it. Designed to be a conversation starter, I’m sure it will be a helpful tool in our staff development arsenal.

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Of course I won!

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Another interesting game which I got to play a month or two ago at an OU event was Accreditation! (see below) designed by Rachel Forsyth and Nicola Whitton from Manchester Metropolitan University. THis is one to reflect on. Have a go yourself because all you’ll ever need to play the game is here: http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/page/44087950/Accreditation!

Accreditation!

Another one we played explored the initial student experience. We were encouraged to place snakes or ladders comments onto a typical student timeline:

Initial Student Experience

Engaging Hearts and Minds

“This Best Practice Guide has been put together by the UCISA Academic Support Group to provide examples of good practice in engaging academics, and other staff, in the use of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL).

The guide contains ten case studies which look at a variety of methods for engaging academics such as:

  • setting up communities of practice
  • developing intensive training and support programmes
  • incorporating TEL into Postgraduate Certificate courses
  • encouraging academics to publish their research in TEL.

Each case study describes the activity and the approach taken, provides an evaluation of the activity and discusses future developments and transferability. “

http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/sitecore/media%20library/Files/publications/case_studies/SSGASG_Engaging

U21 Learning Environment Design Forum

Background

The University of Birmingham hosted the 5th U21 Learning Environment Design Forum from 19th to 23rd September 2011. The focus of the challenge this year was one “of creating more effective on-campus learning environments within the context of building refurbishment and the issues relating to the design of effective learning environments within buildings built 100, 50 and 12 years ago which can provide an equality of experience for the students across those buildings.”

“The design forum is intended to engage participants in discussion and design activity aimed at creating new generation learning environments in higher education.  An important aspect of the forum is its aim to promote inter-disciplinary approaches to the design and development of improved learning environments and, to this end, the event encourages the involvement of those with a professional role in this field – including property and estates leaders, audio-visual and information technology staff, educational and curriculum designers, professional/faculty developers and academics.”

The Forum

Staff from the University were joined by colleagues from Melbourne, Virginia, Hong Kong, Auckland, Dublin, Lund, Shanghai Jiao Tong, Nottingham, Derby, Aston universities.

Participants were arranged into 4 groups of 4-5 members and given a real-life design activity based on actual campus settings (Arts building and Learning Centre). Days 1-4 included a mixture of design time, networking and short contextual presentations. Day 5 concluded with team presentations to a range of senior University staff. The presentations will feed into the Learning Spaces division & Schools discussion re use of learning spaces in these buildings. An exciting and exhausting time was had by all participants.

Presentation by Team 3: http://prezi.com/j1kbzt006xlz/u21-learning-spaces-design-forum-2011/